What are the Mexican property laws?

 

   Mexican Law provides for private ownership of land by foreigners, and its law is very specific about the way in which land rights should be transferred from seller to buyer, and also what type of lands are not eligible for public ownership. A Notary Public will guide you through the details of these, but generally:


  • Property may be purchased and owned outright for residential use by foreign nationals outside of the 100km restricted land border zone, or outside of the 50km coastal zone;
  • Inside of the restricted border/coastal zones, foreign nationals may own land through a fidecomiso (a trust) which is set up through a bank and provides for ownership of the land and property in all but name.

   The Mexican Constitution previously banned foreign nationals from owning property that was within the restricted border zones. This old law was intended to protect Mexican soil from foreign invasion. Because the Constitution cannot be altered in this respect, the Government introduced a system of land trusts, so that foreign nationals could invest in property inside of the 'restricted' zones. So now, if you as a foreigner, want to buy a dream home with a Pacific beach view, you now can, except that it will be by means of a trust, set up through one of the main banks in Mexico.


   The trust holds the deeds to the property, and you and/or other named persons which you specify are sole beneficiaries to the trust (and therefore the property). You have full rights to do whatever you like with your property: it can be developed (in accordance with local planning regulations), rented, leased, sold, or given away. In other words, you own the property in all but name.

   The trust enables you to name a beneficiary upon your death, and you do not need to have a Mexican Will in order for your wishes in regard to the trust to be executed. You do not have to be resident in Mexico to own property there, so there is no need to qualify for resident status under immigration laws in order to have a property investment in Mexico.


   Mexican Law on property ownership is comprehensive and provides protection for the seller and the buyer in all property transactions, provided that the law is followed, and you ensure that all necessary documentation is present and that the procedures are adhered to. Your Notary Public is an important person in this process, and he/she will guide you.

   Then you buy real estate in Mexico, you would do well to consider taking out Title Insurance on the property. Title Insurance covers you should the property you buy subsequently turn out to have liens associated with it. This especially relevant if the property you are buying has been privatized, having previously been classified as being "Ejido" lands (see below), but even if this is not the case, Title Insurance will protect you if any other previously unforeseen lien or charge is brought against the property before you took possession of the Title Deed. Rates for Title Insurance are around US$5-US$5.50 per US$1,000 of the property's value; pay-able once only at the point of purchase. A good Estate Agent in Mexico will be able to advise you further about Title Insurance.


 
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